Affective Disorder

The term "affective disorder" refers to emotional problems, such as anxiety and depression, which differ from "cognitive disorders." An affective disorder can be brought on by significant life events, stress, trauma, specific medical conditions, and medications.
Affective Disorder Sociology Definition

Definition

The term “affective disorder” refers to emotional problems, such as anxiety and depression, which differ from “cognitive disorders.” They comprise one of the main categories of mental disorders condition. This disorder can be brought on by significant life events, stress, trauma, specific medical conditions, and medications.

Explanation

Mood disorders, or affective disorders, are a subset of mental conditions. The severity of a person’s symptoms might vary from minor to severe.

Neurotransmitters, often known as brain chemicals, significantly influence mood. An emotional disorder may occur due to an imbalance in them or incorrect signaling to the brain. Life experiences can set off affective disorders. Any affective condition, including depression, can be brought on by a traumatic experience or emotional loss. The use of drugs and alcohol increases the risk. There appears to be a hereditary component as well. An individual is more likely to get one of these illnesses if a family member already has one.

These illnesses impact both men and women. Additionally, they can affect anyone of any age, color, or financial level. The sociology of Depression and the sociology of mental illness consider this disorder an important aspect of social research.

In the United States, it is predicted that 21.4% of individuals will suffer from a mood disorder at some point in their life.

Types of Affective Disorders

  1. Obsessive Compulsive Disorder
  2. Bipolar Disorder
  3. Post-traumatic Stress Disorder
  4. Seasonal Disorder
  5. Atypical Depression
  6. Generalized Anxiety Disorder
  7. Phobias including Agoraphobia
  8. Dysthymia and Cyclothymia
  9. Postpartum Depression
  10. Panic Disorder
  11. Unipolar Depression

Mood swing vs. Affective Disorders

Natural mood swings are not the same as affective disorders. Mood swings are a common reaction to daily stressors and events, and they often have little to no detrimental impact on a person’s ability to function in everyday life. On the other side, affective disorders can significantly impact a person’s quality of life by resulting in problems with their relationships, careers, and self-esteem.

Treatment

A psychiatrist or other qualified mental health practitioner can determine an affective disorder. An assessment by a psychiatrist is used for this. It can disrupt the personal lives of individuals. But there are solutions out there, including both medicine and psychotherapy.

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